The OSPAs, Perpetuity Research and TECAs are to run a series of free Thought Leadership webinars to address current security issues following the coronavirus pandemic.

A number of world-renowned speakers will come together to debate issues affecting the security industry in a series of sessions due to take place over the coming weeks. Registration links for future sessions can be found below.


Upcoming Webinars

Tuesday 7 July at 15:30 (BST):

What should we expect from security leaders? Are they good enough?

Common themes running through past webinars has been the extent to which the security sector has failed to achieve proper recognition for all it has achieved; that it is consistently underappreciated for its efforts and achievements; and that it has been poor at broadcasting its benefits. Such a consistent message would suggest that security has been poorly guided by its leaders. Yet, enormous progress has been made in recent years and there have been some quite outstanding achievements (as signified by winners of the OSPAs). Moreover, some say the security sector is structured in such a way that impedes progress, it is fragmented and fails to speak with a unified voice. Given this, this webinar puts the role of security leaders under the spotlight, how are they doing and where can they do better? Topics to be discussed include:

  • How have leaders in the security sector performed? How much potential is there for more and better collaboration?
  • What are the ways in which security leadership could be enhanced?
  • What has been the experience of Covid-19 and how might leaders be expected to adapt post the crisis?

Panellists:
Godfried Hendriks – 2020 Global President at ASIS International (Netherlands)
Donna Kobzaruk – Executive Director, Regional Manager at a Major Financial Institution
Juan Muñoz – CEO at Associated Projects International (Spain)

Thursday 9 July at 15:30 (BST):

Developing skillsets in the security sector: do security professionals know how competent they need to be?

Skills for Security
Sponsored by Skills for Security

In previous webinars we have witnessed discussions about the need for the security sector to upskill; a crucial step to earning more respect from its stakeholders. Some have noted that as security is a global activity there is merit in countries understanding the competencies needed at different levels and sectors and then uniting behind an agreed approach which could be understood by all. So far though attempts have been piecemeal. There have been more attempts to define security competencies – and there are a lot of them – than to build on them in any meaningful way. This webinar will discuss:

  • How important is an industry/national approach to skills development? To what extent is this a prerequisite for offering a meaningful career development program for recruits?
  • What are the best ways of developing skills across the security sector? Where are there opportunities?
  • What are the roles, if any, of a Skills Body, trainers and professional development programs?

Panellists:
David Scott – Managing Director at Skills for Security (UK)
Simon Banks – Founder and Director at CSL Group (UK)
Olivier Hassid – Partner and Director at PwC France
Jason Brown – National Security Director at Thales (Australia)

Tuesday 14 July at 15:30 (BST):

Thinking about Innovation in security and crime prevention: where can we look and what can we find?

Purchasers of security – of services and technologies – have sometimes lamented the lack of innovation of the security sector. Either purchasers ae unrealistic, and/or the security sector is moribund of good ideas, and/or there are misconceptions about what it is realistic to expect from security innovation. Then there are claims that progress towards innovation is dogged by a lack of collaboration, and/or by a lack of investment. While others point to a range of impressive breakthrough in a diverse range of areas and invite us to look more carefully and be prepared to be impressed. How, if at all, have Covid-19 changed the focus and interest in innovation? This webinar will explore these issues in more detail. Topics to be discussed include:

  • What different approaches exist towards security innovation?
  • Where can we look to for the new ideas and the evolving good practices?
  • What are the prospects for innovation in a post Covid-19 world?

Thursday 16 July at 13:30 (BST):

Covid-19, where to now for private security in South Africa?

Around the world the issues facing the security sector differ markedly. South Africa is characterised by extremes in terms of security expertise: from the highly skilled to those who operate under the radar of regulation, some using technology very effectively and some not at all. The lockdown has put pressure on businesses and it is far from clear clients will pay for the same types of security going forward. Crime patterns are changing and there is an undercurrent of discontent both in communities and in organisations where employees, anxious about home and working life, post different types of risks. We will debate these issues and where security in South Africa goes from here, specifically:

  • What are the main challenges facing the security sector as it emerges from lockdown?
  • To what extent will changes in public and business expectations influence the types of security that will need to be provided?
  • What factors will govern whether security post Covid-19 is a success?

Panellists:
Andrew Kelly – Senior Security Manager: Global Operations at Coca Cola
Lizette Lancaster – Project Manager: Crime and Justice Information and Analysis Hub at Institute for Security Studies
Leonie Mangold – Vice Chairman of ESDA, Special Project Sales Consultant at Powelltronics
Jean-Pierre (JP) Smith – Councillor, City of Cape Town

Tuesday 21 July at 15:30 (BST):

Climate change and security: unrest, the carbon footprint and the security response

Sponsored by Bidvest Noonan

Before Covid-19 the dominate social and political problem facing the world was widely acknowledged to be climate change; the planet is heating up and humans are responding, slowly. The issue impacts on all areas of policy, but what about crime prevention and security? This has largely operated under the radar. Yet the implications are serious. What does the carbon footprint of the security sector look like? Where are the largest emissions? Do emissions vary by crime type and how? And what about the security response? What should we expect from security responses and how can the sector best contribute, and will it? What does sustainable security look like? What if anything has been the impact of Covid-19?

  • How important is an industry/national approach to skills development? To what extent is this a prerequisite for offering a meaningful career development program for recruits?
  • What are the best ways of developing skills across the security sector? Where are there opportunities?
  • What are the roles, if any, of a Skills Body, trainers and professional development programs?

This series of Thought Leadership Webinars is supported by